Article Comment: How Many Schools Are There in Your State Meet?
11/17/2012 9:43:47 AM
Coach
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This is interesting. Are all of these states running 5k at state or are some still 4k?
This is interesting. Are all of these states running 5k at state or are some still 4k?
11/17/2012 2:20:51 PM
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The article talked about how North Dakota uses ghost runners to fill out the team scores. I remember when Colorado used to do that as well. Mid 1990's - early 2000's, if my memory is correct. Anyone know when that practice ceased in Colorado? Just curious.
The article talked about how North Dakota uses ghost runners to fill out the team scores. I remember when Colorado used to do that as well. Mid 1990's - early 2000's, if my memory is correct. Anyone know when that practice ceased in Colorado? Just curious.
11/17/2012 8:42:04 PM
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Great resource! However, please ask your reps to account for private/independent schools as well. This will give a more accurate view of the number of schools represented by each state. Thanks for the consideration!!!
Great resource! However, please ask your reps to account for private/independent schools as well. This will give a more accurate view of the number of schools represented by each state. Thanks for the consideration!!!
11/18/2012 11:35:58 AM
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[quote=Drovers96]This is interesting. Are all of these states running 5k at state or are some still 4k?[/quote] @Drovers96 All states are either 5K or 3 mile (or thereabouts) for boys. Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Mississippi, and maybe one or two others run 4K (or 2 mile) for girls.
Drovers96 wrote:
This is interesting. Are all of these states running 5k at state or are some still 4k?


@Drovers96

All states are either 5K or 3 mile (or thereabouts) for boys. Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Mississippi, and maybe one or two others run 4K (or 2 mile) for girls.
11/18/2012 11:38:17 AM
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[quote=tayloga]Great resource! However, please ask your reps to account for private/independent schools as well. This will give a more accurate view of the number of schools represented by each state. Thanks for the consideration!!![/quote] @tayloga Most states include private schools in the same association. I have separate numbers for private schools in TX, VA, GA, and NJ. If you let me know of others that have separate divisions for private schools, I'll try to run those down.
ayloga wrote:
Great resource! However, please ask your reps to account for private/independent schools as well. This will give a more accurate view of the number of schools represented by each state. Thanks for the consideration!!!


@tayloga

Most states include private schools in the same association. I have separate numbers for private schools in TX, VA, GA, and NJ. If you let me know of others that have separate divisions for private schools, I'll try to run those down.
11/19/2012 1:25:31 AM
Coach
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I agree that this is interesting information. But I don't think participation numbers on their own tell a complete story of each state's championship meet. We can see how many classes each state has. But how are those classes determined? What does it take to reach the state meet - how many "qualifying rounds" are there? What percentage of teams are represented at the state meet? Those are some questions that when answered give those numbers a little more meaning. Let's look at Colorado for example: -There are approximately 330 high schools in a state with a population of 5 million. -We have 4 classifications that are not determined by participating schools, but by blanket ranges for all sports. These adjust on a two year cycle. -We have have a single state qualifying round (regional race) for each classification. Those qualifying races yielded 178 teams at the 2012 state meet - 91 boys teams and 87 girls teams. There is overlap here as some schools send both a boys and a girls team. This of course would be true for any state. -3A/4A/5A advance 5 teams per region, 2A advances 40% of scoring teams from each region. -Individuals advance by being in the top 15 overall and not on a qualifying team. Now compare to Illinois (the only state that I am really familiar with): -approximately 760 high schools in a state with a population of 12.8 million. - 3 classifications for cross country that are determined on a yearly basis and then divided as such: The smallest 40% in Class 1A, the next smallest 30% in Class 2A, and the remaining 30% in Class 3A. - There are two qualifying rounds for state in each classification - Regional race with 7 teams advancing to the sectional race. Then 5 teams from each sectional advancing to the state meet. Those qualifying races yield 150 teams - 75 boys teams and 75 girls teams or 25 teams in each boys and girls race. -Individuals advance by being the first 5 not on a qualifying team regardless of overall place in the race. This is the case for regional to sectional and then sectional to state. I'm not using this comparison to say one is better, but there are definitely differences here in the overall number of teams at the state meet and how that comes about. Each state has a unique story and I think that contributes to those numbers that are reported in the article. I'd love to know if other folks out there have this kind of information from other states and can share it.
I agree that this is interesting information. But I don't think participation numbers on their own tell a complete story of each state's championship meet. We can see how many classes each state has. But how are those classes determined? What does it take to reach the state meet - how many "qualifying rounds" are there? What percentage of teams are represented at the state meet? Those are some questions that when answered give those numbers a little more meaning.

Let's look at Colorado for example:
-There are approximately 330 high schools in a state with a population of 5 million.
-We have 4 classifications that are not determined by participating schools, but by blanket ranges for all sports. These adjust on a two year cycle.
-We have have a single state qualifying round (regional race) for each classification. Those qualifying races yielded 178 teams at the 2012 state meet - 91 boys teams and 87 girls teams. There is overlap here as some schools send both a boys and a girls team. This of course would be true for any state.
-3A/4A/5A advance 5 teams per region, 2A advances 40% of scoring teams from each region.
-Individuals advance by being in the top 15 overall and not on a qualifying team.

Now compare to Illinois (the only state that I am really familiar with):
-approximately 760 high schools in a state with a population of 12.8 million.
* 3 classifications for cross country that are determined on a yearly basis and then divided as such: The smallest 40% in Class 1A, the next smallest 30% in Class 2A, and the remaining 30% in Class 3A.

* There are two qualifying rounds for state in each classification - Regional race with 7 teams advancing to the sectional race. Then 5 teams from each sectional advancing to the state meet. Those qualifying races yield 150 teams - 75 boys teams and 75 girls teams or 25 teams in each boys and girls race.

-Individuals advance by being the first 5 not on a qualifying team regardless of overall place in the race. This is the case for regional to sectional and then sectional to state.

I'm not using this comparison to say one is better, but there are definitely differences here in the overall number of teams at the state meet and how that comes about. Each state has a unique story and I think that contributes to those numbers that are reported in the article.

I'd love to know if other folks out there have this kind of information from other states and can share it.
11/21/2012 10:24:18 PM
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@jboele To start answering your question, there are 109 schools that run cross country in New Mexico. Each district sends (up to) three teams to state, but a couple of districts didn't even have three full teams of both genders, let alone more than three. This year 15 of 22 5A teams (each, boys and girls) competed at the state meet. 18 of 26 4A teams, and so on. Utah is similar. 4 teams out of each region qualify for state, which means a majority of teams advance to state out of regionals. Still, their state fields are substantially smaller than Colorado's. I believe 16 of 24 teams qualified for state in both 5A and 4A in Utah this fall. I don't know exactly how many schools in Utah run cross country, but the number is similar to New Mexico's, though probably slightly higher.
@jboele

To start answering your question, there are 109 schools that run cross country in New Mexico. Each district sends (up to) three teams to state, but a couple of districts didn't even have three full teams of both genders, let alone more than three. This year 15 of 22 5A teams (each, boys and girls) competed at the state meet. 18 of 26 4A teams, and so on.

Utah is similar. 4 teams out of each region qualify for state, which means a majority of teams advance to state out of regionals. Still, their state fields are substantially smaller than Colorado's. I believe 16 of 24 teams qualified for state in both 5A and 4A in Utah this fall. I don't know exactly how many schools in Utah run cross country, but the number is similar to New Mexico's, though probably slightly higher.

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